Patriarch prays for full union between Catholic, Orthodox churches :: Catholic News Agency (CNA)

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Patriarch prays for full union between Catholic, Orthodox churches :: Catholic News Agency (CNA).

Istanbul, Turkey, Nov 29, 2014 / 10:20 am (CNA/EWTN News).- In a prayer gathering on the second day of Pope Francis’ visit to Turkey, Patriarch Bartholomew I welcomed him with joy, saying his presence is a symbolic “bridging” of the East and West.

“May these holy fathers, on whose teaching our common faith of the first millennium was founded, intercede for us to the Lord so that we may rediscover the full union of our Churches, thereby fulfilling His divine will in crucial times for humanity and the world,” Patriarch Bartholomew I said on Nov. 29.

Directed toward Pope Francis, the speech took place during an ecumenical prayer gathering held at the Orthodox cathedral of St. George in Istanbul, after which the Pope and the Patriarch held a private meeting.
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Undersecretary asks youths to compete with elders for jobs

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The first Undersecretary in the National Ministry of Petroleum and Mining on Thursday during the award of PETRONAS scholarships to 13 South Sudanese students to study in Malaysia urged youths to compete with old people to get Jobs.

Marcher Achiek said the aged would not surrender the country to young people who are not competitive.

National Education ministry Undersecretary Michael Lopuke called on the students to be humble and ambassadors of South Sudan in Malaysia.

He attributed the current crisis in the country to leadership mismanagement of decisions.

PETRONAS said with new 13 students, the number of South Sudanese learners increased to 78 since 2000, adding that they graduated 40 students and another 25 still studying in University Teknologi PETRONAS.

Separated by borders, united by needs: MSF provides medical assistance to South Sudanese in White Nile State, Sudan

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Since February this year, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has been providing medical assistance to over 30,000 South Sudanese who fled their homes to White Nile State in Sudan. Most of those arriving are from Upper Nile State, which borders Sudan to the south-east. Since the conflict started in South Sudan on 15 December, 2013, many South Sudanese have been internally displaced and others forced to seek refuge in neighbouring countries. Those arriving have told our teams that they have fled for fear of being attacked or after being attacked.

MSF, in collaboration with the Sudanese Ministry of Health, is providing medical care and nutritional support to those arriving in White Nile State. To date, the medical aid organisation has conducted over 36,174 consultations, vaccinated 2,333 children under 5 years old for polio, and 8,566 children under 15 years old for measles following a positive diagnosis. This preventive care approach has helped curb disease outbreaks in the area.

“Most of those arriving are women, children and the elderly; they are coming on foot or by public transport. Since some of them are in poor health and nutritional condition, we are conducting medical consultations and nutritional screening on arrival. Severely malnourished children are immediately enrolled into the therapeutic feeding programme, while supplementary food is provided for those moderately malnourished,” says Dr. Amir Osman, MSF medical team leader in White Nile State.

Currently, there are 3,230 people enrolled in the MSF therapeutic feeding programme. They receive regular medical check-ups and supplementary food. Malnourished pregnant and lactating women are also under close observation given the high numbers of women arriving. So far, MSF has conducted 2,111 antenatal care consultations with 152 safe deliveries.

Most of those in White Nile come from the four major towns of Waddakona, Kaka, Al-Renk, Malakal and their surroundings. All of them left due to insecurity, some managed to salvage a few of their possessions while others left with nothing. “I walked for three days from Waddakona, Upper Nile State to North Kweik, in Sudan, where I had to sell my cows, sheep and goats to get money for other necessities,” says Nyabok Adwok.* “I used to be a government employee and self-dependent, now I’m in another country and dependent on aid,” she adds.

Most people entered Sudan through the western area of the Nile and settled around Um Jalala area commonly known as ‘Kilo 10’ but have since been relocated to three transitional areas, namely Jorai, El Kashafa and El Rades. Some entered via the eastern side of the Nile settled in an area called Al-Alagaya. These areas are near the Nile in order to facilitate water transportation. Water transportation is especially important during the rainy season when roads become impassable and only boats can be used to transport patients with complicated medical cases across the River to hospitals in Kosti, the second capital of the state. In El Kashafa area, MSF has constructed a 20-bed clinic to be able to respond rapidly to critical cases while using mobile clinics to reach those in the other two transitional areas, which are about 7 and 15 km away, respectively.

The medical needs of the population are apparent; on average, MSF conducts over 4,300 consultations per month and refers about 15 cases to Kosti. Moreover, living conditions are very congested, with 6-7 people forced to live in a Tukul (hut) meant for 2-3 people. The congestion increases the spread of communicable diseases such as respiratory tract disease, one of the main illnesses that MSF teams in White Nile are treating. In order to help prevent the spread of communicable diseases as well as diseases associated with water, hygiene and sanitation, MSF has identified groups of community health workers to carry out health education activities.

Heavy rains may deter the numbers of those arriving as most people cannot cross the flooded river into Sudan. However, whenever renewed violence erupts in parts of South Sudan bordering Sudan, numbers automatically go up. Just a few kilometres of now watery border lines separate the two countries that a little over three years ago were one. Yet, despite the border that divides them, the commonalities and mutual relations between those arriving and the host community have eased acceptance and the two populations co-exist peacefully. Some even say that the host community is happy and protective of their neighbours from South Sudan, creating a secure situation favourable for the provision of aid.
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*Not real name.

65-year-old pupils in Lainya to join Loka Secondary School

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Two 65-year-old pupils studying under the Accelerated Learning Program in Lokurubang Primary School of Lainya County in Central Equatoria are hoping to join Loka Senior Secondary School after completing their primary eight this year.

Alfred Puto Gordon, who spent nearly six years pursuing his studies, encouraged old people to continue with studies interrupted by the civil war after independence.

Accelerated Learning Program teacher Joseph Towong Clement said the two elderly pupils are doing well in the class, advising the aging group to go to school and be example to youth.

He cited many challenges facing Lokurubang Primary School including lack of teachers and support from non-governmental organizations.

Another elder pupil, Emmanuel Lukudu, a lay reader and father of five, expressed happiness of studying with his five children in the same school.

The pupil said he is studying at old age to help him preach the word of God and communicate in many languages.

http://www.bakhitaradio.org/?q=node/6612

Two 65 year old men to join Loka Secondary School Next year

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Afred Gordon and Emmanuel Lukudu P 8 finalist at their sixties hoping to join Loka senoir SS 2015

Afred Gordon and Emmanuel Lukudu P 8 finalist at their sixties hoping to join Loka senoir SS 2015

Afred says he has six children with home they come and attend class in the same school

Afred says he has six children with home they come and attend class in the same school

Afred at the school compound

Afred at the school compound

Afred stands for Photo next to post writen ''Avoid coming late to school''

Afred to media '' I started school in 1963 but war disturbed me.  I am finishing my P 8 this year and i will join Loka Secondary  but money is my problem''

Afred to media ” I started school in 1963 but war disturbed me. I am finishing my P 8 this year and i will join Loka Secondary but money is my problem”

Alfred Gordon, Emmanuel Lukudu and two female pupils they attend class together

Alfred Gordon, Emmanuel Lukudu and two female pupils they attend class together

Alfred Puto 65 years finishing  Primary Eight   going home after studies

Alfred Puto 65 years finishing Primary Eight going home after studies

Alfred right have six children, Emmanuel five all study together in one school, they say are happy to be witheir children in class

Alfred right have six children, Emmanuel five all study together in one school, they say are happy to be witheir children in class

ALP teacher  Joseph Towong  speaking to media in Lokurubang primary school Lanya CES

ALP teacher Joseph Towong speaking to media in Lokurubang primary school Lanya CES

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Lainya pupils beg government to reduce school dropout rate

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Pupils of Holy Cross Primary School

Pupils of Holy Cross Primary School

Pupils of Holy Cross PS in Loukurubang Primary School

Pupils of Holy Cross PS in Loukurubang Primary School


Pupils of Holy Cross Primary School Lanya County

Pupils of Holy Cross Primary School Lanya County

Lainya County Holy Cross Primary pupils in Central Equatoria appealed to the state government to put local orders to guard against school dropout among pupils in various schools.

17-year old primary eight candidate Agnes Seluwa decried inequality prevalence in labour at home between boys and girls as affecting their performance in school, Radio Easter reported.

The pupil accused some parents of favouring boys in giving scholastic needs, forcing them to marriage and using abusive language.

Ms Seluwa also accused some teachers of forcing pupils to sexual relationship.

The pupil called on local authorities to take action against parents forcing children to early marriage.

The pupil made the appeal during the International Day to Eliminate Violence against Women celebration organized by Plan International South Sudan Program in schools.
– See more at: http://catholicradionetwork.org/?q=node/16199#sthash.iuujnRXw.dpuf

Pupil reads their club call for controll on school drop out in South Sudan during the international day to elminate violence against women

Pupil reads their club call for controll on school drop out in South Sudan during the international day to elminate violence against women

UN Refugee Agency hands over new girls’ dormitory to the Juba Orphanage Home

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UNHCR_PRESS_RELEASE_UN_Refugee_Agency_hands_over_new_gir ls’_dormitory_to_the_Juba_Orphanage_Home_

26 November 2014 Juba – The UN Refugee Agency hands over to the Central Equatoria State Ministry of Gender and Social Development a Girls’ dormitory at the Juba Orphanage Home constructed by the United Nation High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) at an inaugural ceremony in Juba on Wednesday 26 November 2014.

The handover of the girls’ dormitory is part of the activities to mark the annual 16 days activism against sexual and gender based violence under the 2014 theme; “empowering women and girls – working together to address sexual and gender based violence.”

The dormitory includes a common room, dining room, matron’s room, showers and toilets of the total value of 248, 000 US dollars (786, 000, 800 South Sudanese Pounds).

The dormitory constructed by UNHCR in 2014 is to provide a secure accommodation for children who have lost both parents during forced displacements, to restore human dignity and proper care, provide the children with education opportunity, develop the children into good and responsible citizens through self-reliance and re-unite the children with relatives.

To date, the Juba Orphanage accommodates 78 orphans affected by the previous and recent civil wars in South Sudan and returnee children, out of whom 21 are girls and 57 are boys.

The UNHCR Representative, Cosmas Chanda is hopeful, that “the girls’ dormitory will enhance capacity of the Government of Central Equatoria State Ministry of Gender and Social Development to address problems faced by female orphans and that the Juba Orphanage Home will have the required facility and to fulfill the duty to protect female orphans from sexual and gender based violence.”

Archbishop Lukudu calls on priests to continue serving people

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The Catholic Archbishop of Juba while presiding over the Eucharistic celebration and ordination of Frs. Jackson Yugusuk and Joseph Wani on Sunday, urged priests to renew their Holy Order and continue to serve the people of God.

Archbishop Paolino Lukudu Loro instructed the new priests to sanctify the Christian community based on the power of God.

The Archbishop told the faithful that they also have power and duty to serve other people of God in many different ways.

Archbishop Lukudu said the Catholic Church is ordaining priests to work for peace and development in South Sudan.

He advised politicians to think about their country and people rather than their families and parities.
http://www.bakhitaradio.org/?q=node/6597

WAR IN IBADAN

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ZILLAS NETWORK

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Political thugs kill 3, burn 10 houses, over 200 shops in 4
communities

STORY AND PICTURES BY OLUSEYE OJO, IBADAN

Three days after thugs shot dead a Police Inspector at a
political rally in Oke- Ado, Ibadan, another tragedy hit the
Oyo State capital yesterday, as three persons were feared
dead in another politically motivated fracas that engulfed
Born Photo, Isale Osi, Popo and Idi-Arere communities, in
Ibadan South-West Local Government.

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How to Save Journalism

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Candace Writes Here.

Yesterday, a group of people gathered in Seattle for a fascinating discussion with my friend Jon Landay, an award-winning investigative journalist who covers national security and intelligence issues for McClatchy News. Our plan was to talk about Iraq, ISIS, and journalists in danger, then discuss the “so what” part at the end.

From the very beginning, though, the conversation took a turn toward the ultimate crisis in war reporting. In addition to the physical and mental health risks, there’s an even bigger risk: No one will care.

As journalist Tom Peter shared after James Foley’s beheading, “It’s harder to accept what really happened, which is that he died while people eagerly formed opinions on his profession and the topics he covered without bothering to read the stories he put in front of them.”

Reader apathy alone is demoralizing, but that’s only the start of the problem. With apathy comes lower readership. With lower…

View original post 1,265 more words